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Application recommendations

1. Target assessment

The first step is to assess the soil through soil sampling and laboratory analysis to determine the target disease or pest organism. For example, weeds, fungi and nematodes are present at different levels beneath the surface and may require a different product application method.

2. Soil preparation

The ideal condition for planting is also the ideal condition to disinfect. The ideal condition occurs when there is a consistent prevalence of pores at the appropriate depth, enabling the product to penetrate through soil particles. This means the soil must be neither too compacted nor contain too many coarse clods.

The soil must be humid for three key reasons:

  • Water activates respiration and wakes up the target pest from dormancy. It can also reach pests in the deeper soil layer if the soil is kept humid for at least two weeks before application. Therefore, it’s important to start irrigation at least 10 days before Nemasol application.
  • Water is the medium that enables Nemasol to reach the target disease or pest.
  • Water increases the product's movement.

Before application, the soil must have a field capacity between 50% and 75%, depending on the type of soil.

Graphic of satruation field wilting

3. Application, sealing and monitoring

Nemasol offers a broad spectrum of control over a very wide range of climatic zones through different application methods. Grower application practices vary widely, depending on factors such as target crop type, geography, farm size, level of mechanization, climate, open field or protected area.

Immediately following application, it is mandatory to seal the soil by one or combined sealing methods. This practice enhances product effectiveness and is required for the safety of workers, bystanders and residents.

Two advantages of monitoring for residual air or soil methyl isothiocyanate (MITC) concentration:

  1. Checking the work/residents’ environment for safety during and after application
  2. Checking for potential phytotoxicity risk after disinfection and soil aeration
  1. Drip irrigation (also known as chemigation)
    Through drip irrigation, the product is supplied as a water-diluted system to irrigation tubes via an automatic dosage controller/dosage pump.

  2. Soil injection
    This method is for the deep application of the fumigant into the soil. There are different injection systems available for field or greenhouse application and different soils; for example, shank injection or goose foot injection may be appropriate depending on the soil type.

  3. Soil incorporation
    With this method the product is also injected into the soil, but this is followed by tilling/mechanically mixing it into the soil, creating an even, homogeneous and well-aerated soil after application.
Application methods: drip irrigation, shank injection and soil incorporation

To learn more about the different application techniques, visit here:

Metam activity is the same regardless of the application method. 
Following Nemasol application, the active ingredient metam starts decomposing into MITC.

Chemical formula of active ingredient metam decomposing into methyl isothiocyanate (MITC)

MITC is highly soluble in water and is present in the three phases of the soil matrix: soil, air and water.

Graphic of 3 phases of the soil matrix: soil, air and water
  • MITC is the major gaseous active metam decomposition product.
  • MITC shows solubility and volatility characteristics suitable for soil disinfectant purposes exploiting the porosity of the soil.
  • A significant portion of MITC in the soil exists in the form of a water solution.
  • MITC movement/diffusion in soil operates mainly with water.
  1. Soil compaction
    Compaction of the upper 1-2 centimeters of soil by a compaction roll slows down MITC emission. This method is often employed in conjunction with application by soil injection or soil incorporation.

  2. Water seal
    Premature product loss is avoided by wetting the upper few centimeters of soil. However, this method is not suitable for all soil types. Too-clayish soil typically has blocked soil pores, which may reduce product efficacy in the top layer.

  3. Plastic film
    Plastic film can be applied to improve product efficacy while reducing disinfectant emission risks. A standard low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film of 20-30 µm thickness is widely used for this process. Although LDPE presents a certain permeability to gases, the use of such films helps reduce the MITC emissions. TIF (totally impermeable film) has the highest gas barrier properties. The application of plastic film enables additional solarization effects under appropriate climatic conditions.
    Removed plastic film should not be reused. It must be appropriately disposed of or recycled based on available local options.

    See stewardship manuals for detailed information about the different application and sealing methods.
    Learn more

Photo ionization detection (PID)
PID is a sensitive, quick-response electronic device that measures gas concentrations of volatile organic compounds (i.e., MITC). It expresses the concentration in ppm MITC after calculation with the specific response factor/correction factor for MITC.

Detection tubes
Depending on manufacturers’ instructions, a volume of ambient air is pumped through a sealed glass gas reaction tube after inlet and exhaust (pumpside) tips are broken off. The gas reacts with a coloring agent sorbed on carrier material. The readings are made of the discolored zone on a numeric MITC concentration scale.

  1. Drip irrigation (also known as chemigation)
    Through drip irrigation, the product is supplied as a water-diluted system to irrigation tubes via an automatic dosage controller/dosage pump.

  2. Soil injection
    This method is for the deep application of the fumigant into the soil. There are different injection systems available for field or greenhouse application and different soils; for example, shank injection or goose foot injection may be appropriate depending on the soil type.

  3. Soil incorporation
    With this method the product is also injected into the soil, but this is followed by tilling/mechanically mixing it into the soil, creating an even, homogeneous and well-aerated soil after application.
Application methods: drip irrigation, shank injection and soil incorporation

To learn more about the different application techniques, visit here:

Metam activity is the same regardless of the application method. 
Following Nemasol application, the active ingredient metam starts decomposing into MITC.

Chemical formula of active ingredient metam decomposing into methyl isothiocyanate (MITC)

MITC is highly soluble in water and is present in the three phases of the soil matrix: soil, air and water.

Graphic of 3 phases of the soil matrix: soil, air and water
  • MITC is the major gaseous active metam decomposition product.
  • MITC shows solubility and volatility characteristics suitable for soil disinfectant purposes exploiting the porosity of the soil.
  • A significant portion of MITC in the soil exists in the form of a water solution.
  • MITC movement/diffusion in soil operates mainly with water.
  1. Soil compaction
    Compaction of the upper 1-2 centimeters of soil by a compaction roll slows down MITC emission. This method is often employed in conjunction with application by soil injection or soil incorporation.

  2. Water seal
    Premature product loss is avoided by wetting the upper few centimeters of soil. However, this method is not suitable for all soil types. Too-clayish soil typically has blocked soil pores, which may reduce product efficacy in the top layer.

  3. Plastic film
    Plastic film can be applied to improve product efficacy while reducing disinfectant emission risks. A standard low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film of 20-30 µm thickness is widely used for this process. Although LDPE presents a certain permeability to gases, the use of such films helps reduce the MITC emissions. TIF (totally impermeable film) has the highest gas barrier properties. The application of plastic film enables additional solarization effects under appropriate climatic conditions.
    Removed plastic film should not be reused. It must be appropriately disposed of or recycled based on available local options.

    See stewardship manuals for detailed information about the different application and sealing methods.
    Learn more

Photo ionization detection (PID)
PID is a sensitive, quick-response electronic device that measures gas concentrations of volatile organic compounds (i.e., MITC). It expresses the concentration in ppm MITC after calculation with the specific response factor/correction factor for MITC.

Detection tubes
Depending on manufacturers’ instructions, a volume of ambient air is pumped through a sealed glass gas reaction tube after inlet and exhaust (pumpside) tips are broken off. The gas reacts with a coloring agent sorbed on carrier material. The readings are made of the discolored zone on a numeric MITC concentration scale.

4. Waiting period

Following application of metam, there is a quick buildup of a peak concentration of MITC followed by a decrease as MITC immediately starts to dissipate. In general, a waiting period of two to six weeks is recommended prior to planting. However, the specific waiting period depends on local soil, weather conditions, label requirements and whether the application was carried out in the field or a greenhouse.

5. Seeding or planting

A cress test is always recommended to ensure all MITC has been converted. The soil is safe for planting if, after one to three days, the seeds in the treated jar germinate normally compared to the untreated check. See stewardship manuals for detailed information.

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Certain statements may not be applicable in all geographical regions. Product labeling and associated claims differ based on government requirements. Use plant protection products safely. Always read the label and product information before use.